Forever to become, never to be

Tartan: queer, genderplaid Seattlite, writer, dork, casual historian, reblogger of people in suits, etc.

LJ / AO3

medievalpoc:

Hiya,
I’ve started a new tumblr to share free/open nonfiction ebooks made available by the publisher.
Lascasbookshelf.tumblr.com
The first few titles include
as well as some titles that deal with 20th history
I’d be grateful if you could let your readers know
Cheers
This is an absolute GEM of a tumblr! Thank you so much for letting me know and sharing these FREE BOOKS with everyone!! I have added links in above.

becausebirds:

avianrecon:

Raptor Surfing - The curious sport in which smaller birds fearlessly drive hawks & owls out of their territory by being incredibly annoying.

(All pictures are watermarked to their talented owners)

Birb surfing

(via tardis-stowaway)

ikchen:

sithpumpkin:

soft-goth:

vegan-vulcan:

thinksquad:

Want to attend college for free? It can happen if you learn German.

All German universities are now free to Americans and all other international students. The last German state to charge tuition at its universities struck down the fees this week.

Even before Germany abolished college tuition for all students, the price was a steal. Typically semester fees were around $630. What’s more, German students receive many perks including discounts for food, clothing and events, as well as inexpensive or even free transportation.

In explaining why Germany made this move, Dorothee Stapelfeldt, a Hamburg senator, called tuition fees “unjust” and added that “they discourage young people who do not have a traditional academic family background from taking up study. It is a core task of politics to ensure that young women and men can study with a high quality standard free of charge in Germany.”

Actually, German universities were free up until 2006 when they started charging tuition. That triggered such a crush of criticism that German states began phasing out this policy. Lower Saxony was the last holdout.

It’s too bad that politicians in the U.S. don’t feel that a college education is worth supporting appropriately. State aid to the nation’s public universities took a nosedive during the 2008 recession and education funding remains well below those levels. The average state is spending 23 percent less per student than before the recession, according to a report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Actually, state support has been declining for public universities for a quarter of a century. Using an interactive tool from The Chronicle of Higher Education, you can see how state government subsidies have cratered at individual institutions.

With the average undergrad borrower now leaving school with more than $29,000 in debt, the free ride in Germany can look awfully tempting.

How to handle the language barrier

German is not an easy language to learn. Fortunately, however, there are international language programs in Germany, which have become very popular with international students before they tackle obtaining a degree in a different language.

What’s more, an increasing number of German universities are offering degrees in English. These are often called international studies programs or in some other way have the word international in their title.

http://www.wtsp.com/story/news/2014/10/03/german-colleges—free-degrees—americans/16658027/

This is actually making me cry…it’s one of those times when you realize that your own government just truly, honestly, does not give a shit about your wellbeing in any way.

ICH SPRECHE DEUTSCH

udlock

c’mon over, guys! :D

I may have to do the thing.

(via fuzzybooks)

lbmisscharlie:

I want a shed.

Man, I love The Guardian’s collection of writers’ rooms. And I really want to turn my sun porch into a library/writing room.

I always forget to do this, but hi!

Have, as your welcome present, the title of a book I found in the process of looking up that last one I reblogged: Mollie’s War: The Letters of a World War II WAC in Europe by Mollie Weinstein Schaffer. I’ve had a hard time finding stuff like diaries and letters by in active service in WW2 so I’m excited this exists.

havingbeenbreathedout:

lbmisscharlie:


Creating GI Jane: Sexuality and Power in the Women’s Army Corps During World War II, Leisa D. Meyer (1996)

Further to this post, anyone interested in queer histories of WWII might want to check out this book! We read a couple of chapters for class, and I’ve duly added it to my winter break/summer break possible future fic research list.

In Creating GI Jane, Leisa Meyer traces the roots of a cultural anxiety at the core of the American psyche, providing the historical perspective needed to understand the controversies still surrounding the gendered military. Drawing upon a rich array of sources including oral histories, army papers, congressional hearings, cartoons, and editorials, Meyer paints nuanced portraits of the experiences of women soldiers against the backdrop of strife and opportunity during the war years.
The book chronicles the efforts of the female WAC administration to counter public controversy by controlling the type of women recruited and regulating service-women’s behavior. Reflecting and reinforcing contemporary sexual stereotypes, the WAC administration recruited the most “respectable” white middle-class women, limited the number of women of color, and screened against lesbian enlistments. As Meyer demonstrates, the military establishment also upheld current sex and race occupational segregation, assuring the public that women were in the military to do “women’s work” within it, and resisting African-American women’s protests against their relegation to menial labor.
Yet Creating GI Jane is also the story of how, in spite of a palpable climate of repression, many women effectively carved out spaces and seized opportunities in the early WAC. African-American women and men worked together in demanding civil rights deriving from military service. Lesbians found the military simultaneously dangerous and conducive to community formation during and after the war. In this fresh, provocative analysis, Meyer offers compelling evidence that these struggles had lasting effects on larger civil rights movements that emerged in the postwar years.


Oh intriguing! *Files away for future reference*

More reference! Wooooooooo

havingbeenbreathedout:

lbmisscharlie:

Creating GI Jane: Sexuality and Power in the Women’s Army Corps During World War II, Leisa D. Meyer (1996)

Further to this post, anyone interested in queer histories of WWII might want to check out this book! We read a couple of chapters for class, and I’ve duly added it to my winter break/summer break possible future fic research list.

In Creating GI Jane, Leisa Meyer traces the roots of a cultural anxiety at the core of the American psyche, providing the historical perspective needed to understand the controversies still surrounding the gendered military. Drawing upon a rich array of sources including oral histories, army papers, congressional hearings, cartoons, and editorials, Meyer paints nuanced portraits of the experiences of women soldiers against the backdrop of strife and opportunity during the war years.

The book chronicles the efforts of the female WAC administration to counter public controversy by controlling the type of women recruited and regulating service-women’s behavior. Reflecting and reinforcing contemporary sexual stereotypes, the WAC administration recruited the most “respectable” white middle-class women, limited the number of women of color, and screened against lesbian enlistments. As Meyer demonstrates, the military establishment also upheld current sex and race occupational segregation, assuring the public that women were in the military to do “women’s work” within it, and resisting African-American women’s protests against their relegation to menial labor.

Yet Creating GI Jane is also the story of how, in spite of a palpable climate of repression, many women effectively carved out spaces and seized opportunities in the early WAC. African-American women and men worked together in demanding civil rights deriving from military service. Lesbians found the military simultaneously dangerous and conducive to community formation during and after the war. In this fresh, provocative analysis, Meyer offers compelling evidence that these struggles had lasting effects on larger civil rights movements that emerged in the postwar years.

Oh intriguing! *Files away for future reference*

More reference! Wooooooooo

havingbeenbreathedout:

capstellarogers:

For those writing stucky (slash or femslash) set in WW2, here’s a few good (albeit brief) stories of queer servicemen and -women: http://glbthistory.org/OutranksWeb/WorldWarII/World%20War%20II.htm

http://thankyoulgbtservicemembers.wordpress.com/category/wwii-heroes/ has two entries: one on Alan Turing, one on Johnnie Phelps (she’s discussed below). Also wider site has more stories of lgbt service members; unfortunately they were only active two months in 2011

From what I can find, sources that talk about this sort of thing agree that many queer women served in the WAC, with widely varying degrees of openness.

In 1947 (bit after Stella’s time, but still relevant), WAC Sergeant Johnnie Phelps was on General Eisenhower’s staff. According to a transcript of their conversation, she was told by General Eisenhower, “It’s come to my attention that there are lesbians in the WACs, we need to ferret them out…. ” Phelps replied, “If the General pleases, sir, I’ll be happy to do that, but the first name on the list will be mine.” Eisenhower’s secretary added, “If the General pleases, sir, my name will be first and hers will be second.”Phelps then told Eisenhower, “Sir, you’re right, there are lesbians in the WACs – and if you want to replace all the file clerks, section commanders, drivers, every woman in the WAC detachment, I will be happy to make that list. But you must know, sir, that they are the most decorated group – there have been no illegal pregnancies, no AWOLs, no charges of misconduct.” Eisenhower dropped the idea.

(Took the quotes verbatim from Wikipedia. Don’t have access to their source, but I’ve confirmed the content of the conversation, if not the actual words, elsewhere).

Other sources on lesbianism during Stella and Beck’s time:

In general - http://sitemaker.umich.edu/lesbianhistories/home

Between the World Wars -

http://sitemaker.umich.edu/lesbianhistories/browse_the_essays&mode=single&nextMode=list&column0=PrimaryCategory&recordID=0000c0a8de10000007d4b8010000014246778b5fbbc3e623&comparisonType0=contains+%28text+only%29&value0=between

WW2 and Beyond (includes discussion on enlisted lesbians) -

http://sitemaker.umich.edu/lesbianhistories/browse_the_essays&mode=single&nextMode=list&column0=Tags&recordID=0000c0a8de12000007d6090500000134653ba4a0233a956c&comparisonType0=contains+%28text+only%29&value0=%7BWAC%7D

Unfortunately a lot of good stuff is behind a pay wall, or only in print :/ Will post more once I’m back at university, so I can access their books and journals

Reblogging in case the linked references are of use to tartanfics (I know it’s the US instead of the UK, but possibly interesting anyway), and also because that anecdote about Johnnie Phelps and Eisenhower’s secretary is P H E N O M E N A L.

Yes, these links are excellent! I’d seen that anecdote but not with attached resources. And my story recently acquired an American dimension, so US stuff potentially useful as well. :D

tedaltmans:

WOCtoberfest Celebrations: America Chavez in (almost) every issue of Young Avengers Vol. 2

tedaltmans:

WOCtoberfest Celebrations: America Chavez in (almost) every issue of 
Young Avengers Vol. 2

sarandco:

all i’ve been drawing is america chavez but i’m not going to apologize for it 

(via kelslk)

deviatesinc:

Suffragist Mabel Vernon, who organized the Silent Sentimentals protests, and later met her partner of over 30 years, Consuelo Reyes, through her work fighting for Latin American rights via the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom.

sadghostboners:

So the whole ‘on your left’ thing that Steve shouts to Sam when he passes him up
Kind of a running joke huh?

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* People You Should Know
Albert Cashier :: (December 25, 1843 – October 10, 1915)
-Transgender Civil War Soldier
-Born Jennie Irene Hodgers, in Ireland
-Served for three years in the 95th Illinois Infantry of the Union army 
-Fought in the battles of Nashville, Mobile, and Vicksburg
-Following war, received Veteran’s pension
- Worked in Illinios for forty-plus years following the war as a cemetery worker and deckhand
- After breaking his leg, a nurse questioned Chashier’s gender expression. After (many) a plea from Cashier, the nurse kept the information private
- In 1911, Cashier moved in to Soldier and Sailors Home (an assisted living for former members of the Civil War/U.S. defense)
- Cashier lived there until his mind started to deteriorate (possibly from dementia)
- Following Cashier’s health decline, nurses started to assist Cashier. During this time, reports were filed and Cashier was forced to dress in women’s dresses. 
- Cashier’s tomb read Albert Cashier until 1970 when a second tomb stone was erected with both Cashier’s born name and identified name
 

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* People You Should Know

Albert Cashier :: (December 25, 1843October 10, 1915)

-Transgender Civil War Soldier

-Born Jennie Irene Hodgers, in Ireland

-Served for three years in the 95th Illinois Infantry of the Union army

-Fought in the battles of Nashville, Mobile, and Vicksburg

-Following war, received Veteran’s pension

- Worked in Illinios for forty-plus years following the war as a cemetery worker and deckhand

- After breaking his leg, a nurse questioned Chashier’s gender expression. After (many) a plea from Cashier, the nurse kept the information private

- In 1911, Cashier moved in to Soldier and Sailors Home (an assisted living for former members of the Civil War/U.S. defense)

- Cashier lived there until his mind started to deteriorate (possibly from dementia)

- Following Cashier’s health decline, nurses started to assist Cashier. During this time, reports were filed and Cashier was forced to dress in women’s dresses. 

- Cashier’s tomb read Albert Cashier until 1970 when a second tomb stone was erected with both Cashier’s born name and identified name

 Albert Cashier

crumblingpages:

image

Some of Hetty King’s rules for evening attire from the article:

"Wear black bone buttons on your white evening vest.
Wear a white corded or black bow tie.
For a top coat, wear a tight-fitting black cloth, slightly belied as to shape, reaching to the knees.
Whatever you…